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Home / Doug's Beer Republic  /   Review: Kerne Craft Dry Cider

     
Kerne Craft Dry Cider 
Posted: 8 October 2015  Beer Republic 8.0 
Kerne Craft Dry Cider from France I've had dry ciders before, like the really mediocre Strongbow, and they're so dry they don't even taste like apples at some point.  Kerne's Craft Dry Cider has that perfect balance between dryness and sweetness.  Even my wife, a cider despiser at the beginning of the summer, embraced it.    
Avg price/liter: USD 10.66   ABV %: 4.5  Type: Cider    
       


In the last two months, I've been on a mission to sample fruit beers, lambics, and ciders.  I didn't grow up exposed to any of these categories and for most of my life, these kinds of beers just weren't available.  Along for the ride is my wife who NEVER had the opportunity to try any of the above.         

The journey hasn't always been smooth.   Most of the ciders I've tried have been artisanal-posing ciders made by multinational companies, like Stassen, Magners, and the revolting Tempt.        

And then along came Kerne, billed as French artisanal cider.  Normally, a 750 ml in these parts would cost me upwards of $14 per 750 ml bottle.  I normally don't like to buy large bottles of alcohols I've never yet sampled.  But when Kerne came down the pike on sale for $6 bottle (= the standard price of an imported 330 ml craft brew in Thailand), I couldn't resist and ordered the entire range available here.       

Kerne is a cidery located in the Bigouden region of  Brittany in France, located in the country's northwest.  Cider making goes back centuries in Brittany and enjoys French geographical protected status much like champagne does.  Kerne was founded, not by a Frenchman by the name of Kerne, but by a Frenchman with the stereotypical name of Pierre, way back in 1947.        

The first Kerne cider we tried is known by the company as Le Kerne, its Craft Dry Cider.  No fillers are used, no added sugars either as far as I can tell.  Just pure apple juice fermented with the natural yeasts on the apple skin.        

I've had dry ciders before, like the really mediocre Strongbow, and they're so dry they don't even taste like apples at some point.  Kerne's Craft Dry Cider has that perfect balance between dryness and sweetness.  Even my wife, a cider despiser at the beginning of the summer, embraced it.  She was so happy drinking it, she begged me to order more so she could gift bottles to her general manager and co-worker.       

Imagine you're biking across the French countryside and you pass by a small booth of artisans making fresh apple juice.  This is sort of the same thing except the artisans have now allowed that juice to ferment in vats and then strained it.          

If I was guaranteed for the rest of my life to drink cider neither better nor worse than this, I'd sign on the dotted line immediately.      

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8 Oct 2015
 
Voltaire Brown's Don't Travel Europe

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