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Home / Doug's Beer Republic  /   Review: Ayinger Weizenbock

     
Ayinger Weizenbock 
Posted: 8 November 2015  Beer Republic 7.0 
Ayinger Weizenbock from Germany  Weizenbocks aren't a common style today, not even in their native Bavaria.  Ayinger is well regarded as a maker of wheat beers. It was no big leap for them to make an extra strong version with darker malts. If you're not on a paleo diet and anti-grains, get both your barley, your wheat, and your alcohol fix all in one tasty bottle for a price that won't thin out your wallet.     
Avg price/liter: USD 8.80   ABV %: 7.1  Type: German Wheat   
       


The Germans always liked their beers dark. The town of Einbeck birthed the dark bock style.  Einbeck had a reputation for a time as THE place to get beery in Germany.  Bavarian beers back then were not as appetizing.          

Einbeck fashioned delicious wheat beers, too, and visiting Bavarian nobility guzzled them with envy.  By the 18th century, pubs serving dark Bavarian beers had no choice but to serve wheat beers as well.   Eventually, the Bavarians improved their beers and wheat beer popularity waned.      

Their were some stalwarts who wouldn't let wheat beer die.  Georg Schneider was a brewer widely credited with reviving wheat beer's fortunes.  Schneider's granddaughter-in-law (= the wife of his grandson) introduced to the weizenbock style to Bavarians in 1907, combining dark Munich malts, wheat beer, and the alcoholic strength of doppelbocks.  A weizenbock is a the wheat beer version of a dubbel.            

Weizenbocks aren't a common style today, not even in their native Bavaria.  I'd certainly never heard of them.  I only ordered this beer because it was featured on the home page of the online store I routinely buy brews from.  I found out later the Ayinger Weizenbock is a winter seasonal beer, available only from the end of September.       

Ayinger is a private brewery that's been around since 1877, yet their Weizenbock only made it to American shores in 2009.  Thailand is usually twenty years behind the US for many trends.  With the internet and increased globalization, I guess that gap is shrinking.  The beer showed up in Thailand this year.   

Ayinger is well regarded as a maker of wheat beers. It was no big leap for them to make an extra strong version with darker malts. And they succeed better than I would have envisioned.  What you get is a fuller richer wheat beer taste without a strong alochol taste -- exactly what I treasure in a cold one. 

If you're not on a paleo diet and anti-grains, get both your barley, your wheat, and your alcohol fix all in one tasty bottle for a price that won't thin out your wallet. 

If you liked reading this, consider savoring these reviews:
 Peroni Red from Italy -- 4.7% alcohol by volume
 Liefmans Fruitesse from Belgium -- 3.8% alcohol by volume
 The Complete Beer Republic Index


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8 Nov 2015
 
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