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Aug
11

Consult Your Doctor … Or Not

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Are guys like him the ideal people we should be consulting?

Disclaimer: None of the information revealed in this article is a substitute for advice from a licensed health care professional.  You should not use any of the information contained herein for the purpose of disparaging or ridiculing your trusted and devoted primary care provider … to his face. Behind his back is another matter.

Nothing stated below has been evaluated by the FDA or its equivalent in any other nation. For a huge sum sent to the right address, it would be. You should not read this article with the intention of diagnosing, treating, curing or preventing any health condition or disease except ignorance.

If you experience disgust while reading this article, contact your medical health care provider immediately! Or a comedian. They say laughter is the best medicine.   You may have better luck with the comedian.

– – – – – – – – –

In the hopes of improving the results I get out of meditation, I started regularly listening to a number of Hemi-Sync albums.  Hemi-Sync is short for hemispheric synchronization.  Robert Monroe, the brains behind the patented technology, maintained that Hemi-Sync synchronizes the left and right hemispheres of a person’s brain.  Some of the professed benefits are better relaxation, learning, and, my objective, attaining altered states of consciousness.

There are no released numbers on how many people throughout the 40-year history of the product have ever bought a Hemi-Sync CD or digital album, but I could safely bet other peoples’ fortunes that the combined totals of every single Hemi-Sync product ever sold wouldn’t qualify the series for Recording Industry Association of America’s Platinum status.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this brilliante articlo, okay mates?]

Categories : Health
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Aug
04

Two Days From Vacation To Cremation

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Life can undergo a huge alteration in the most unexpected of places but the long term horizon always looks the same

For the last five years, at least, my wife has spoken about us visiting the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Luang Prabang in northern Laos. Although I’d returned to Laos a half dozen times on visa runs since officially moving to Thailand, I’d never made it back up to this Communist peoples’ republic’s tiny cultural showpiece in the north since my first visit there in 2005. My wife finally committed, selected a quaint well regarded hotel on the less popular side of the Nam Khan River, and during the third week of June, we caught an economical 90-minute flight out of Bangkok.

She made her objectives quite clear: she wanted to do nothing over our three-night stay. I put up no argument. I had explored the town’s temples, the nearby waterfalls, and the scenic Mekong River during that initial 2005 visit. During the humid afternoons, we’d pedal our way to the town center on bicycles the hotel provided, to visit a Western café for organic coffees and French-style pastries or get a massage, then return to the hotel to lounge in the pool with a couple of Beer Laos. In the evening, we’d ride the hotel’s rickety longboat back across the river for happy hour and dinner.

This R & R proceeded, without event for our entire stay. On our final night, we went to bed late after a superb Lao fusion dinner. We had nothing to get up early for. We could avail ourselves of our hotel’s fantastic breakfast until noon, and our flight back to Bangkok was at 4:45 PM. With June being the extreme low season and no other guests at the hotel, the staff graciously allowed us to check out at 3:15 PM for no extra charge before we caught our shuttle to the airport only a couple of kilometers away.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this brilliante articlo, okay mates?]

Categories : Lifestyle
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Jul
07

The Love-Hate Spectrum

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There are people and things we love hating and others we hate loving — and plenty more in between

I wonder: is it possible to get through life without someone eventually asking your opinion about something?

“How was that restaurant?” “How was your date?” “How was your vacation to Thailand?”

Most of the askers don’t want a detailed answer, and we know it, so we develop a habit of keeping our answers brief. Our stock answers are “I loved it,” “I hated it,” or “It was okay.” The world becomes black and white with a single shade of grey right in the center.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this brilliante articlo, okay mates?]

Categories : Lifestyle
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Mar
24

The Evaporation Of Friendship

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The friendship material wasn’t higher quality then. You just had more opportunities to meet it and time to refine it.

The friendship material wasn’t higher quality then. You just had more opportunities to meet it and time to refine it.

Last week, I came across an interesting thesis expounded by a reporter in a Boston paper. He says the biggest threat facing middle-aged men isn’t obesity or smoking, but loneliness. Middle-aged men let their friendships lapse, experience depression as they age, and spiral downward from there.

I’m certainly guilty of letting old friendships stagnate, but I probably have a better excuse than most. I moved around a lot and far away after university, before there was e-mail and social networks to make staying in touch effortless, not that most of us do. I now live half a world away. I calculated that in the last 25½ years, I’ve only seen my best friend from university a total of less than two weeks. I went eight years without seeing him after college, though we stayed in touch by phone, and another seven years from the time I left the US to the time I returned for my first visit.

Seven or eight years ago, when I was living in a beach resort town in Thailand, I made a concerted effort to have Guys Nights Out at least once a month. Three to five guys would show up, enough to make it worthwhile and still keep it personal. All the better if one of the other guys brought along someone I didn’t know as long as the occasions remained a night out for just the guys. As time progressed, some of the other guys didn’t take the nights out seriously. One brought his prostitute-like ‘girlfriends.’ People didn’t make the time, they started moving away, and the nights got shelved.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this brilliante articlo, okay mates?]

Categories : Lifestyle
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A lot less information would have done wonders for this guy's psyche

A lot less information would have done wonders for this guy’s psyche

There is a fine Indian restaurant located on the street parallel to the one on which we live. Five-star hotels in the area often use them to cater the occasional Indian wedding. By Thailand standards, it’s on the expensive side. 

A couple of years back, my wife noticed they’d begun to offer a weekend brunch for around $17. Inflation has since raised that price to $26. This brunch isn’t so much a buffet as an all-you-can-order feast. You select any dish on the brunch menu, and the waiters deliver it to you: appetizers, salads, tandoori platters, mains, desserts.  The first time we went, I got a little carried away and ordered eight dishes up front. When all eight were delivered at once, occupying every available square inch of the small table, my wife became overwhelmed and barely spooned in a morsel.

Too much, too soon.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this brilliante articlo, okay mates?]

Categories : Health
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Jan
20

Best Friends Or Adios Forever?

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How painful is it to accept never seeing another person again?

How painful is it to accept never seeing another person again?

When I was in grade school, possibly all the way up into high school, the custom was to have your fellow students sign your yearbook at the end of the academic year. This is a quite interesting concept if what people wrote in your yearbook ingenuously captured the relationship between the two of you at the time.

I briefly re-read some of the signatures on a trip back to my father’s recently. They read like this: “To Doug, a person in my social studies class.” “Thanks for the fun and the stories.”  “Good luck. See you next year.”

Harlequin romances make better reading.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this incredible article, okay?]

Categories : Reality
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Jan
13

The Credential Thief

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How much of what you tell other people about yourself is fake?

How much of what you tell other people about yourself is fake?

It’s nothing new that people embellish their curriculum vitaes, humbly known as resumes the last time I drafted one. This avenue of fabrication has been paved for centuries, possibly millennia, as long as employment-for-remuneration has existed. Wherever and whenever somebody requires another somebody to do something, there will always be an applicant reinterpreting his or her past accomplishments to be on par with discovering the cure for cancer.   


Go to LinkedIn and read over random peoples’ profiles. Everybody is a “problem solver”, a “team leader,” an “entrepreneurially-minded visionary.” Past experience as a line cook becomes “food science maverick innovator.” Household cleaning is rewritten as “domestic service engineering.”

Let’s not ignore outright fibbing. Have a five month gap somewhere between jobs? Suddenly, the job that lasted for three-quarters of 2013 now takes up the whole year and then some.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this incredible article, okay?]

Categories : Success
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All exits ultimately lead to the same place on these circus grounds

All exits ultimately lead to the same place on these circus grounds

In Part 1, I outlined a very valid reason why voting in a U.S. Presidential election is an utter waste of time.

You can readily think of why you show up for your job, at your favorite restaurant, at your friend’s party. But showing up at a polling station to vote for the President produces no measurable return for the average voter.

Contributing cash or volunteering time and then voting is more of a waste.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this kick the s–t article, okay?]

Categories : Politics
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Guess what?  The joke's on us.

Guess what? The joke’s on us.

An American citizen can’t legally order alcohol at a bar Stateside until he’s 21; but by age 18, as a legal adult, he has the ‘right’ to vote.

Most of those young ones find the alcohol imbibing privileges the more meaningful of the two.  So do plenty of older folk like myself.

Am I being overly simplistic and droll? Voting might yield personal rewards for the scads of local elections that don’t make the news , for positions like county treasurer, president of the city council, or precinct committeeperson.  Even then, most of the local voting public probably derive more joy from choosing what beer or whisky to drink.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this kick the s–t article, okay?]

Categories : Politics
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When receiving can be more taxing than giving

When receiving can be more taxing than giving

I have had a fascination with Life magazine for over 20 years. It first started when I was on my way out of Burma in 1994. An American I’d met there, Mike (whom I’m still in touch with now), returned to our Yangon hotel holding an issue from the 1960’s that appeared like it had just been printed the week before, a Life Asia edition the original owner must never have read. Inexplicably, these issues were being peddled on street corners along with Burmese bags and trinkets. Mike had paid just a couple of bucks for his one souvenir issue. 

The power of Life after death. 30 years after these magazines were issued they were boosting Burmese GNP!

I was so impressed digesting Mike’s blast-from-the-past that I beat the streets of the Burmese capital to start my very own Life magazine collection. I picked up only 8 issues at that time. I would have purchased more but I was in the middle of a longer trip and shipping things back to the USA in 1994 from Burma or Bangladesh, my next destination, wasn’t a slam dunk. I later amassed a sizeable collection living in Los Angeles which eventually went into storage in a remote town in Oregon for 7 years.   And I picked up another dozen issues in Australia. Ironically, the issues purchased Down Under, not the ones from Burma and Bangladesh, never made it back to the USA.

[Click the picture to read the rest of this kick ass articlo, okay mate?]

Categories : Misc
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