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Home / Doug's Chocolate Republic  /   Review: Beryl's Camior Light Bittersweet

     
Beryl's Camior Light Bittersweet 
Posted: 20 June 2011    4.0 
Beryl's Camior Light Bittersweet  Beryl's Bittersweet doesn't need the blame for poor taste placed upon the use of an unorthodox sweetener. This chocolate, I'm sure, is just as "heavenly" (by Malaysia's lower heaven defining standards) without the sugar as it is with. Heaven in this case consists of a waxy mouthfeel and a tangy back note. Let's say this is the fourth class standing room only area of heaven. When you're this far back and can barely hear or see the stage, you're better off with first class cushioned seats in hell, even if it is a little warm over there.    
Avg price/gram: USD 0.023   Cocoa %: 41  Size: 50g  Malaysia chocolate 
       


Beryl's fine chocolates are "heaven in your mouth" boasts the company's advertisements and web site.  Beryl's business execs should windThailand chocolate label up going to hell for propagating those lies.  Okay, so maybe the company isn't lying.  The Beryl's web site maintains that "at Beryl's, it's all about delivering the best chocolates in Malaysia."  Malaysia doesn't enjoy a sublime reputation as an Asian chocolate manufacturing powerhouse.  Beryl's being the best in Malaysia doesn't mean on a world stage that it has to be very good -- and it isn't.  Beryl's chocolates could be heaven, by Malaysian standards, in your mouth.  The Malaysian population consists of Buddhist Chinese, Muslim Malays, and Hindu Indians.  There's great room for interpretation what heaven means in this country.

I was minding my own business at the local Gourmet Market where my wife was hunting for some dumpling wrappers, and this brand caught my eye.  The wrapping was nice, and the price was reasonable.  When I noticed it was a product of Malaysia, my jaw dropped in dejected fashion, but I vowed to put my preconceived biases aside to judge this bar.  That is hard to do.  The Cadbury bars made in Malaysia are the worst Cadburys I've ever had. 

I knew I wasn't in the presence of greatness immediately.   Knell's Law of Ingredient Omissions dictates that if you're going to leave the cocoa solid content off the bar's wrapper, then you've got everything to hide.  But Beryl's couldn't hide its 'secrets' when the bar got imported to Thailand.  The Thai import label reveals all, and for a bittersweet bar, in the upper 40's or higher in cocoa solid percentage count for the better bars, Beryl's scores low immediately. The signs were bad before the very first bite! 

I would've been happy to have tasted Beryl's chocolate using sugar, so that any negatives I may have highlighted on the taste scale couldn't be blamed on an alternative sweetener.  No such Beryl's were to be found in this marketplace.   For the Camior Light range, Beryl's uses isomalt, a sugar alcohol containing half the calories of regular sugar.  I could find no fault with the isomalt.  It was a reasonable sugar substitute, just like other sugar substitutes I've tried recently in other chocolates, a more convincing sugar substitute than a sweetener like stevia, which leaves a noticeable and distinct aftertaste.

Beryl's Bittersweet doesn't need the blame for poor taste placed upon the use of an unorthodox sweetener.  This chocolate, I'm sure, is just as "heavenly" (by Malaysia's lower heaven defining standards) without the sugar as it is with.  Heaven in this case consists of a waxy mouthfeel and a tangy back note.  Let's say this is the fourth-class standing room only area of heaven.  When you're this far back and can barely hear or see the stage, you're better off with first class cushioned seats in hell, even if it is a little warm over there.          

Avoid; and if unavoidable, later disavow you've ever tried it.  My official stance now is that I was drunk when I selected it off the shelf.       

If you liked reading this, consider savoring these reviews:
  Chocolate Monggo Dark from Indonesia -- 58% cocoa solids
 Bendicks Bitteroranges from UK -- 95% cocoa solids
 The Complete Chocolate Republic Index


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  Beryl's from Malaysia makes bittersweet chocolate with isomalt in their Camior Light range. Do you like bittersweet chocolate? Do you like Beryl's from Malaysia? Beryl's is at the forefront of Malaysian chocolate containing any kind of isomalt. See chocolate republic with Doug of Doug's Republic