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Home / Doug's Chocolate Republic  /   Review: La Molina Le Miscele At Latte

     
La Molina Le Miscele Al Latte 
Posted: 11 September 2011    8.0 
La Molina Le Miscele Al Latte The quality of the 36% Le Miscele Al Latte crept up on me, like many a good milk chocolate bar does. On the first bite, I thought the bar was okay, balanced, tasty, but not worth the prices charged for it. By the fourth block, I knew I was in the presence of craftsmen.  La Molina might not go well on a pizza, but it's fine for everything else.    
Avg price/gram: USD 0.091   Cocoa %: 36  Size: 75g  Italy chocoalte 
       


It's about time Italy had a bar represented at the Chocolate Republic.  Let's be honest.   No one thinks of Italy when they think of fine chocolate.   They think of Switzerland, Belgium, maybe France or Germany.  Italy?  It's a good place to take a canal ride, grab a pizza, and get shot by mafioso.       

I saw this bar in my package from Aussie Dave and initially wondered what kind of crack pipe had he been smoking.  A plain red wrapper with the cocoa solid percentage on the front; the silhouette of a woman on the back with sparse English and Italian text.  No glorified descriptions of exotic flavors to be tasted, no adulterated fantasized version of the company's past.         

La Molina has been around since 2000, started by brothers Riccardo and Massimiliano Lunardi.  Their father had a bakery near Pisa in Tuscany, and the bros spent years making pastries.  The company claims it sources its cacao beans from small plantations. 

La Molina chocolateDoing my research, I found that the company is known for its unusual taste combinations inspired by the traditions of Tuscany.  Yours truly didn't get to sample any unusual combinations, and that's probably a good thing.  Fancy combinations can shield the mediocrity of the underlying chocolate.  A simple milk chocolate tasting is the best way to gauge whether the company has solid chocolate-making chops.

I anticipated La Molina was more than up to the task when I investigated their chocolate range.  The typical manufacturer will have a milk (cocoa solids: 30-35%), a bittersweet (40-50%), a light dark (60%), and maybe a heavy dark (75%).  La Molina isn't scared to not spread their offerings by huge differentials.  Notice their milk range has a 33%, 36%, and 39%.  Enlist Cadbury to make a 33%, 36%, and 39% bar and they'd all taste the same, and Cadbury knows it, which is why they'd never do it.        

The quality of the 36% Le Miscele Al Latte crept up on me, like many a good milk chocolate bar does.  On the first bite, I thought the bar was okay, balanced, tasty, but not worth the prices charged for it.   By the fourth block, I knew I was in the presence of craftsmen.   I gave a piece to my wife.  She loved it and for a small period of time afterwards, Italian food, accents, citizenship, and Mussolini's Fascist philosophies were pleasing concepts to her.  Only then did I try to dig up some background information on this brand I'd never, ever heard of.  

La Molina might not go well on a pizza, but it's fine for everything else.     

If you liked reading this, consider savoring these reviews:
 Dove Hazelnut & Raisin from United Arab Emirates -- 25% cocoa solids
 Casino Dark Chocolate Truffle Fantasy from France -- 49% cocoa solids
 The Complete Chocolate Republic Index


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