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Home / Doug's Chocolate Republic  /   Review: Nestle Kit Kat Shinshu Apple

     
Nestle Shinshu Apple Kit Kat
Posted: 30 March 2014    5.0 
Nestle Kit Kat Shinshu Apple from Japan The Shinshu Apple has a sweetish artificial apple aftertaste meshed with the milk chocolate base. It makes for an interesting combination. If this is your first taste of a Japanese Kit Kat, you'd likely be surprised enough to be impressed.  Shinshu Apple should impress the cheap date you're trying to get into bed. But the more sophisticated prospect will demand something a bit more elegant.    
Avg price/gram: USD 0.035   *Cocoa %: 21  Size: 11.3g   
       
* Estimated cocoa solid content


When I first started reviewing chocolate bars on the Chocolate Republic, I swore the site wouldn't review "mainstream" bars.  I was probably a bit too trigger happy when I made that statement.  What is considered mainstream largely depends on what country you live in.  A Hershey bar won't turn heads in the United States, but can seem exotic enough to Asians, Australians, and Europeans who constantly see Americans eating them on TV and wonder what this famous brand actually tastes like.  Chinese-made Hershey products are a big seller in Thailand. American ones are popular in Korea.         

Over time, I have revised my approach.  I featured Hershey bars on the site to compare the U.S. version with the Chinese-made ones so prevalent in Asia. And I compared Cadbury bars from a number of different nations simultaneously and continued to review various Cadbury bars from throughout the world as I was able to sample them.  I gradually began to realize that a mainstream bar in one country could have an extremely interesting tale to tell if that tale were told in another country.       

Take Kit Kat.  I grew up thinking this bar as commonplace as any Hershey bar.  In fact, the Kit Kats I grew up eating were manufactured by Hershey.  Kit Kat came in but one variety -- uncompelling milk chocolate enrobing thin wafers. Individually, the chocolate and wafer are unexceptional. Together, they are a snack addict's wet dream. When I first traveled to Europe in the late 1980's, I tasted Kit Kats there, also the same one-horse variety.  The bars tasted different because, as I found out later, Nestle manufactures all Kit Kats worldwide except for the USA.        

It was only in the last two years that I noticed Kit Kats available in a wide variety of flavors, and that's because my stepson pointed them out to me when we were walking through a duty-free store in Japan.  Japan has become as obsessive about modifying and improving Kit Kats today as they were about modifying and improving automobiles back in the 1970's and 1980's.  Indeed, Japan has introduced over 200 different flavors of Kit Kat over the last 18 years, a dizzying array I might add.   And lately, a subset of this diverse batch has been exported to other nations, creating a parallel market of sorts.  The milk chocolate Kit Kat, made locally or regionally, is always available, to compete with the much more expensive but more interesting Japanese imports.         

My wife picked up a six-variety pack from the local gourmet store for a pretty penny, and we sat down to taste test them.  The labels and ingredient listings were entirely in Japanese, and for me to determine some of the rather interesting flavors I was ingesting, I had to go onto the internet to match the pictures on the labels to pictures of the bars with their names translated into English.      

For the uninitiated, biting into a Japanese Kit Kat can be a shock to the taste buds.  One one hand, there's the sense of the familiar, the crunch of the flavorful wafer which constitutes the core of any Kit Kat bar.  But then, on the other hand, you start tasting all these other weird and wild flavors.  The Shinshu Apple has a sweetish artificial apple aftertaste meshed with the milk chocolate base.  It makes for an interesting combination.  As a child, I savored chocolate-covered apples for Halloween, and the combo worked in limited quantities.  Nestle Japan pulls the reverse by creating a chocolate bar covered in apple (flavor).        

If this is your first taste of a Japanese Kit Kat, you'd likely be surprised enough to be impressed.  It's so new and different.  After you've tried a half dozen different types, you start appreciating which of these psychedelic East Asian flavor combos work and which don't.  Shinshu Apple should impress the cheap date you're trying to get into bed.  But the more sophisticated prospect will demand something a bit more elegant.              

If you liked reading this, consider savoring these reviews:
 Redstone Margarita from USA -- 34% cocoa solids
 Green & Black Mint from UK -- 70% cocoa solids
 The Complete Chocolate Republic Index


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The Harry Dandruff Universe

  Japanse Kit Kat has so many varieties. Like Shinshu Apple, made from the apple of Japanese royalty by the corporate greed mongerer Nestle