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Home / Doug's Chocolate Republic  /   Review: Guido Gobino Giandujotti Classico

     
Guido Gobino Giandujotti Classico
Posted: 14 December 2014    7.0 
Guido Gobino Giandujotti Classico from Italy Guido Gobino manufactures a range of giandujotti, from 21% cocoa solids up to 23.5%. The chocolates are creamy miniatures that must be individually unwrapped.  If Guido Gobino manufactured lesser quality chocolate, their giandujotti would be just marginally better than any multinational's overly sweet hazelnut confectionary. Guido Gobino definitely delivers and, with their protected geographical indicated hazelnuts added, at a very high price.   
Avg price/gram: USD 0.124   Cocoa %: 21  Size: 150g   
       


Over this Christmas season, I have been given a chance to try an Italian specialty not once, but twice, both thanks to the generosity of my wife.          

It is more common these days, with the paunch of the European Union jiggling around its heftier economic power, to see agricultural products and foodstuffs protected by some kind of geographic indicator. Champagne is one such example.  Only sparkling wines made from grapes grown in the Champagne region of France that endure a secondary fermentation in the bottle can carry this name. We may use the term loosely to refer to sparkling wines in general, but strict oenophiles use the term to refer to real Champagne-made sparkling wines.  A number of cheeses use geographic indictors:  Gorgonzola, Parmagiano-Reggiano, Asiago, Camembert, to name a few.          

I didn't know, until my wife made me aware of it, that Italy has its own protected geographic region manufacturing hazelnuts. In an area south of Turin in the Langhe hills, a special hazelnut grows known as the Piedmont.  The Piedmont is valued for its unique round shape, mild flavor, and high oil content.  Over the centuries, this area of Italy has become famous for hazelnut confectionary.           

And, starting around 1800, gianduja chocolate.  When Napoleon was in command of France and the British blockaded the Mediterranean, Italy fell short of cacao beans to produce chocolate.  A Turin chocolatier, Michele Prochet, mixed the Piedmont hazelnuts, then not protected with special status because there was not yet an overweight and overpaid European bureaucracy to offer such protection, with his limited supplies of chocolate.  Fifty years later, a local Turin chocolate manufacturer coined the term giandujotto after a carnival and marionette character from the region. Hazelnut paste chocolate became a signature food from the hills around Turin.          

To address the obvious question: would the chocolates taste a whole lot different if, say, the hazelnuts came from Turkey, Cyprus, or Greece?  Let's be honest.  The hazelnuts are not added to the chocolate as an intact filling, like you might see in a Lindt hazelnut bar.  In that case, a milder and more oily nut, if Piedmont hazelnuts are really that different, might produce a very different tasting chocolate bar.  Converted into a paste that already contains a lot of sugar?  I'm not buying it.  But Europe's a place which prides itself on its traditions, and if people are willing to pay more to have an 'authentic' article manufactured in the region, you've got a bloated European Union bureaucracy in place to convince you you're on to something special.        

Guido Gobino manufactures a range of giandujotti, from 21% cocoa solids up to 23.5%. The chocolates are creamy wrapped miniatures that must be individually unwrapped.  Good thing, too, for if the giandujotti came in one large bar, you'd be able to gobble it down that much faster.       

I first became acquainted with Guido Gobino's chocolates when I sampled their Lattecacao back in August and gave it high marks. This is expensive stuff, but a nice treat now and then, and you know you've got a winner for a spouse when she brings you home a bar to sample on your chocolate web site.  You're absolutely sure your spouse is a keeper when she comes home a few months later and gifts you a box of giandujotti for Father's Day.           

If Guido Gobino manufactured lesser quality chocolate, their giandujotti would be just marginally better than any multinational's overly sweet hazelnut confectionary. Guido Gobino definitely delivers and, with their protected geographical indicated hazelnuts added, at a very high price.  Consider dipping your tongue in for a special occasion. 

If you liked reading this, consider savoring these reviews:
 Casino Dark Chocolate Truffle Fantasy from France -- 49% cocoa solids
 Green & Black Milk from UK -- 34% cocoa solids
 The Complete Chocolate Republic Index


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